Tribal Magz Still Doing It Tribal

Entering on to the UK Funky scene in early 2009 with Tribal Man Skank which sampled Lil Silva’s Seasons, Tribal Magz has continued to face all the tribulations thrown his way and has finally released the long awaited album which is now a mixtape titled ‘So We’re Doing It Tribal’ showcasing all of his tracks thus far.

Including the Tribal Man Skank remix featuring Gracious K, a track only released via YouTube and the video shortly removed; many didn’t get a chance to hear it. At the time, released as a remix, it lacked creativity so it’s time had passed, but in hindsight the track could’ve been an entertaining if exclusively performed as a PA to bring the audience something new as Migraine Skank and Tribal Man Skank started to exhaust their time, becoming repetitive.

Feeling Funky produced by KG, was a track generally favoured when released, however it had it’s own experience of turmoil with release as the video has to be shot two times, the finishing product disappointing. ‘So We’re Doing It Tribal’ includes both the original and remix feat Sway which was previously only available via Sway’s mixtape. Many ear drums haven’t been graced with this adaptation, even though it was openly appreciated by those who were lucky enough to be a recipient. Some even claimed it was better.

The mixtape overall boasts a number of other collaborations with Tribal Magz including Haynzy, Dymunds, Slix (Ruff Squad) and Lioness not to mention ‘Back 2 Funk’ which has Tribal Man, Flirta D, KIG, Gracious K, Dotstar and Funky Dee all on one track! Does Tribal Magz wish to share his spotlight or is he bewildered about having to stand in it alone? Either way the young man who has always marketed himself as an artist has continued to push through declined clearance, delayed videos and many management changes to produce more than has been achieved by a number of his peers.

Click Here to get your hands on a copy of ‘So We’re Doing It Tribal’

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UK Funky’s Dead!!

If you agree with the above statement, I can already assume that you either weren’t into Funky in the first place, turned off as the fruition of MC tracks took place, or alternatively turned on. This is said because with empathy, it would be agreed.

The UK Funky sound grew much faster than any person could’ve anticipated. Many got accused of jumping on the trend because it was the sound of the moment, while others were turned off by some of the turns taken within the evolution of the music. Others stayed and continued to work on their own personal developments and signatures within their contribution to the music. All the while, what the basic definition of what ‘UK Funky’ sounds like, remained and still does remain undecided by the masses.

As it was the MC tracks that gained the most mainstream attention, this is the identification made by those who took notice, or walked away, at the point of commercial breakthrough. The MCs are getting the most blame for ‘killing the scene’ but it has to be questioned… Why are the MCs getting the blame? Surely it wasn’t the MCs playing the music, it was the DJs… Why were the DJs playing them? Was it the DJs getting hype in the clubs? A DJ is there to entertain, but if you’re a DJ who is also blaming the MCs, were you not wheeling up their tracks in hope to ‘shutdown’? The hype you helped to create is what led to A&R interests. Make it Funky for Me and In The Morning just about got savoured, but there were so many other quality vocal tracks which got left by the waste side. How many of those got wheeled up 6 times in the clubs? Are DJs not also supposed to teach their audiences about the music too?

The MCs never ruined Funky, they helped it gain attention. But for those that require an MC to acknowledge the music as Funky, your only hope is for Funky Dee to retain his throne with another Napa anthem this year. Or maybe the island will birth another star. If not Funky to you is dead.

It has to be begged to differ. Trilla was recently on Radio 1 in doing a live gig in a Newcastle University with Tim Westwood and Mista Jam, as was Funky veteran Donaeo. With both artists tearing the house down, how is it possible for the sound to be dead? One artist is from Birmingham and Funky is labelled a London sound. Surely for someone from the Midlands to get this kind of response in North Yorkshire shows growth. Evidently the borders have been truly demolished.

The sound of Funky has been making presence internationally, recognised and even being produced in countries that have never witnessed the London club scene. Some even boasting a club culture of their own. The DJs within these countries tend to be more supportive of the people making the music. So it has to be asked, how many DJs within the UK circuit really support producers by purchasing their music? With that said, if you’re a DJ, when was the last time you asked a producer to send you a track using your title as a reason why they shouldn’t decline? It doesn’t stop at DJs, how many ‘UK Funky Lovers’ invested in the music with an official compilation in their shopping cart? But when did you last download a mix CD? The MC tracks got signed largely due to the hype on the rave scene within the clubs, but how many felt they were worth the 79p?

The birth of UK Funky was first embraced for it’s rebirth of love and unity within the clubs and the control given back to the DJs. This unfortunately got lost along the way. But the lack of unity does not rest there, as the frequent highly political occurrences have resulted in a very cliquey music scene, in which everybody is accused of being out for themselves. It’s not expected for all to be sharing their Sunday dinner, but surely the scene requires a business-like element to it instead of friendship rings. If not, how heavy is the scene as a contender against the more business like genres within the other elements of the music industry?

The MCs have not been able to continue feeding their audience thus far, and the A&Rs seem to no longer be floating, so anybody wishing to make a quick buck or hoping the jump on a wave of hype can definitely say that their dreams have surely died. But the original sound of Funky has continued to progress within its soulful and tribal elements of the genre, therefore bringing the overall sound back to what the connoisseurs originally fell in love with. To them, Funky is not dead, but more revived, living under the House shelter in refuge.

In saying this, music does not die, it evolves. So unless you’re listening to it in the middle of a cemetery, any kind of music cannot be associated with death. But Logan Sama put across something similar to the above whilst the masses claimed that Grime was dead. Since then artists of the genre have topped national charts on a number of occasions, doing more for UK music that had taken place prior. So even if you’re one that is adamant that Funky is definitely finished, and all the above is garbage, keep an open eye glued.

Tribal Releases!!

As the first skank tracks filtered on the UK Funky scene and onwards, there was continued outrage expressed regarding the artist not seeking authority from producers to use their instrumentals prior to constructing tracks. Something that is unfortunately still happening within the present day.

Unfortunately their has been casualties along the way in cases where producers have objected to the artist’s finished product and therefore not given authority of use when release of the track is sought. Resulting in another instrumental needing to be constructed.

End Result:

Tribal Man Skank first entered on the UK Funky scene this time last year sampling Lil’ Silva’s Seasons, having been remixed featuring Gracious K along the way, he’s now back with a fresh new electro-style beat and electrofied video and is ready to release at all major digital outlets on January 25th 2010

Whether there is still enough appeal within the general public for this track to chart is questionable, but the youngsters are definitely still into the original. But does the new adaptation carry the same weight?

The One Liner Genre?

During the rise of the UK Funky scene the number of Hosts/MCs were rather sporadic. All had gained their veterinary within a previous underground music scene and the aspiring Hosts/MCs were reporting to find it hard to gain platform to showcase their talents. With the veterinary wanting to pioneer the new club scene alone, this resulted in a lack of guidance for newcomers. Feeling pressured to not apply too many bars over the music, as to not make it sound too much like Grime or even Garage, the only clear instruction given to those with ambition to be the man with the microphone in hand, was to keep the bars simple. A hook that is gentle within it’s flow. This changed however as soon as the ‘Nursery Grime’ phase arose.

Within the release of these ‘Nursery Grimes’ it became standard practice for an aspiring Host/MC or artist to find a Funky instrumental and make a track in the way that is heavily witnessed within the Bashment genre. This lead to an influx of new ‘artists’ on the scene and an evolution within the UK Funky sound. Which also left the scene facing a divide.

On the plus side, this change has not only aided in success of limelight, with interest shown from major labels and also media, but this also brang with it a large influx from other UK genres from artists who recognised the opportunity as a genre that could bring them their much desired and previously thwarted success. The result has been many chanced one-liners chanted over and already known Funky production with the most identified being repeated in general conversation amongst followers and non-followers having become the current representation of music.

The composers of the one-liners are receiving the most media and record label attention, leaving the original Funky styled productions at the waste side. A track like “Oi You! Are you gonna bang!?” is jumped on by a major record label A&R with Apple (the producer of Chantes, the track underneath) not even recognised for his talents. Chants like “Show me how you get down!” repeated by the youths who become all to familiar who Gracious K is, but are more than bewildered at the mention of DJ Gregory or Hardhouse Banton. Maxwell D has managed to continue his musical surf across the UK homegrown genres, making a ground breaking effect within his BlackBerry Hype anthem, even to the extreme of stocking a beverage sharing the same name. But the rise of Lil’ Silva has remained a pledge of his own, even with many of these one-lined tracks being applied over many of his productions!!

This is a major turn of events since the Funky scene first arose, when the common complaint was that there were too many instrumentals. Since, there have been many ‘soulful’ styled productions but only a fair few receive any recognition. Minus Egypt’s In The Morning produced by Fuzzy Logik, the same attention from major record label A&Rs has been failed to be achieved. Attacca Pesante ft Shea Soul – Make It Funky For Me, Footsteps ft A.L. – Tell Me, MVP ft Louise Williams – Take Me Away, these are a handful of very well produced soulful Funky tracks that have been disregarded by majors and media, yet they hold a much larger diversity of appeal to the general music listener.

The Funky scene has become to signify a sub-genre where you can gain success from a simple one-liner that requires no level of wit or intelligence to compose. Yet gain the most exposure in commercial media via radio and TV. But how long will this mainstream media last? Can a genre survive on a plague of one-liners? Is Funky due to go down in history as the genre remembered for it’s punchlines? Will any of the one-line composers be able to adapt into what the Funky sound was originally about? Will they start working ‘with’ producers to compose their tracks? Will the more talented ‘artists’ within the genre start getting the same level of attention from media and major label A&Rs? Who knows?…..

If we reflect on the short-lived spotlight received by K.I.G. Family following the release of Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes, it has been proven that without a follow up that holds the same degree of impact, a one-liner has the same lifespan as a seasonal flower. However in saying this, follow up tracks are proving to be a major task within the artists of the scene at present. Donaeo is the only artist to have already released an album at the moment. We can only hope the majority of fellow artists can follow suit.

So we’ve witnessed a rise and takeover by MC/Skank tracks, I am intrigued as to what the next step in evolution holds for the Funky scene.

Tribal Man Skank Remix

I’m sure these guys could’ve been ALOT more creative……. I’m so disappointed!! I guess I expected too much but I thought thier personal evolution would’ve taken them further than “I be the Tribal Man, bussin the Migraine Skank”, in the situation of a remix, there was allowance for a different backing track that was produced for the purpose as well as more affluent lyrical content. This remix could’ve been the banger that blew both previous productions out the water with its own originality….. I think this was a waste of money and time.

What do you think?

Play Ents do it again…..

I found this freestyle video of Play Ents, Gracious K, Fr3E and Addictive as well as others made in special gesture for The Voice. Go buy a copy this week, you’ll see the article in favour of all the recent UK Funky skank tracks…..

Check it Out:

Some are finding this all boring and predict a end on the horizon for the UK Funky Movement, some think it’s just the beginning. I’d be interested to know what do you think??

KIG Family Bring It Down

K.I.G. have finally graced us with their follow up track….. No skanks, no nursery rhymes but got a prominent K.I.G. flavour

Check it out: