The Journey of Sir Marcus of Nasty

Recognised in the present as the leading DJ of the UK Funky scene, Sir Marcus of Nasty has endured many years of persistence and determination. Thus making his existence appreciated and respected by newcomers and legends of the music industry both underground and mainstream. Below is the story of Marcus Nasty’s voyage…

The journey of Marcus Nasty started during the turn of the new millennium whilst the UK Garage scene had started to decline from its peak. With music evolution bringing the birth of the Grime genre, Marcus Nasty moved with the times. So Solid Crew were making major impact both underground and mainstream showing a strength in numbers, encouraging a formation of many other crews, one of which was named N.A.S.T.Y. Crew.

Founded by Marcus Nasty, N.A.S.T.Y. (Natural Artistic Sounds Touching You) Crew which included Mak10, Jammer, D Double E, Kano, Ghetts, Griminal and Terror Danjah amongst others, was one of the highly observed crews of the Grime scene during it’s infant stages and whilst blossoming. With residence on Flavour FM and later moving on to Deja Vu, supporters were able to be entertained via the airwaves as well as within clubs. Although members changed along the way, N.A.S.T.Y. Crew remained form for a period of 4-5 years, unfortunately coming to demise during Marcus Nasty’s absence. Nevertheless all members of the crew have managed to settle personal differences and many members have continued to progress musically with many remaining prominent names into the present day.

The downfall of N.A.S.T.Y. Crew meant that Marcus Nasty had to find new feet within the music scene. Grime was now experiencing a decline due to trouble at events and many DJs had reverted back to Garage, some mixing the music with the soulful sounds found within US House. However whilst exploring the House genre for himself, Marcus Nasty found that he had preference to the more tribal sound which reminded him of the same elements he had enjoyed within Grime and wondered whether any UK producers had attempted to replicate the House sound. Sourcing music from producers previously worked with, Marcus Nasty gained himself a wide collection of a homegrown House influenced sound which included elements found within Garage, Grime and even Jungle. Although producers were unsure of the productions, they were liked by Marcus Nasty who played them and began the birth of the UK Funky scene.

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The One Liner Genre?

During the rise of the UK Funky scene the number of Hosts/MCs were rather sporadic. All had gained their veterinary within a previous underground music scene and the aspiring Hosts/MCs were reporting to find it hard to gain platform to showcase their talents. With the veterinary wanting to pioneer the new club scene alone, this resulted in a lack of guidance for newcomers. Feeling pressured to not apply too many bars over the music, as to not make it sound too much like Grime or even Garage, the only clear instruction given to those with ambition to be the man with the microphone in hand, was to keep the bars simple. A hook that is gentle within it’s flow. This changed however as soon as the ‘Nursery Grime’ phase arose.

Within the release of these ‘Nursery Grimes’ it became standard practice for an aspiring Host/MC or artist to find a Funky instrumental and make a track in the way that is heavily witnessed within the Bashment genre. This lead to an influx of new ‘artists’ on the scene and an evolution within the UK Funky sound. Which also left the scene facing a divide.

On the plus side, this change has not only aided in success of limelight, with interest shown from major labels and also media, but this also brang with it a large influx from other UK genres from artists who recognised the opportunity as a genre that could bring them their much desired and previously thwarted success. The result has been many chanced one-liners chanted over and already known Funky production with the most identified being repeated in general conversation amongst followers and non-followers having become the current representation of music.

The composers of the one-liners are receiving the most media and record label attention, leaving the original Funky styled productions at the waste side. A track like “Oi You! Are you gonna bang!?” is jumped on by a major record label A&R with Apple (the producer of Chantes, the track underneath) not even recognised for his talents. Chants like “Show me how you get down!” repeated by the youths who become all to familiar who Gracious K is, but are more than bewildered at the mention of DJ Gregory or Hardhouse Banton. Maxwell D has managed to continue his musical surf across the UK homegrown genres, making a ground breaking effect within his BlackBerry Hype anthem, even to the extreme of stocking a beverage sharing the same name. But the rise of Lil’ Silva has remained a pledge of his own, even with many of these one-lined tracks being applied over many of his productions!!

This is a major turn of events since the Funky scene first arose, when the common complaint was that there were too many instrumentals. Since, there have been many ‘soulful’ styled productions but only a fair few receive any recognition. Minus Egypt’s In The Morning produced by Fuzzy Logik, the same attention from major record label A&Rs has been failed to be achieved. Attacca Pesante ft Shea Soul – Make It Funky For Me, Footsteps ft A.L. – Tell Me, MVP ft Louise Williams – Take Me Away, these are a handful of very well produced soulful Funky tracks that have been disregarded by majors and media, yet they hold a much larger diversity of appeal to the general music listener.

The Funky scene has become to signify a sub-genre where you can gain success from a simple one-liner that requires no level of wit or intelligence to compose. Yet gain the most exposure in commercial media via radio and TV. But how long will this mainstream media last? Can a genre survive on a plague of one-liners? Is Funky due to go down in history as the genre remembered for it’s punchlines? Will any of the one-line composers be able to adapt into what the Funky sound was originally about? Will they start working ‘with’ producers to compose their tracks? Will the more talented ‘artists’ within the genre start getting the same level of attention from media and major label A&Rs? Who knows?…..

If we reflect on the short-lived spotlight received by K.I.G. Family following the release of Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes, it has been proven that without a follow up that holds the same degree of impact, a one-liner has the same lifespan as a seasonal flower. However in saying this, follow up tracks are proving to be a major task within the artists of the scene at present. Donaeo is the only artist to have already released an album at the moment. We can only hope the majority of fellow artists can follow suit.

So we’ve witnessed a rise and takeover by MC/Skank tracks, I am intrigued as to what the next step in evolution holds for the Funky scene.

Funky Takeover? by Mista Jam

mistajam

With K.I.G Family’s “Head Shoulders Knees And Toes” getting signed to a major label All Around The World/Universal/Island and all of the other labels looking to sign underground hits such as Attacca Pesante’s “Make It Funky For Me” and Princess’ “Frontline”, it seems like the stage is set for funky to make a big dent in the pop charts in 2009.

Is this a good thing? On one hand it introduces a whole new audience to the genre and it could allow the artists that have been grafting away on the underground scene to finally get a proper pay cheque for the work they’ve put in. On the other hand, going ‘pop’ could commercialise and damage the scene forcing it to go back underground – similar to the mainstream’s infatuation in the past with Jungle, Garage and last year’s Bassline phenomenon.

What do you think – is Funky going to be big in 09 and if it is, will it be the end of Funky or just the beginning?

Taken from Mista Jam’s 1xtra blog

Keepin’ It Funky!!

As the funky scene has continued to evolve and start finding its feet within the industry, there have been many developments. A substantial amount of upcoming and also already established DJs are now naming the sub-genre as there speciality, as well as a new found growth in producers now making the music.

Funky Junkie fever has swept over the nation infecting the masses along the way, converting both listeners and music industry hopefuls from the already prominent genres previously named as favourites. The attraction is also being witnessed in the higher entities, where nationally recognised participants within the industry haven’t been able to resist the desire to dabble with the sound.

While funky has retained its diversity within the instrumental aspect, there has been another type of vocal addition that has always had its boundaries, aware that input was greater appreciated by connoisseurs in small doses. A respectable contribution, which in excess would surely turn a good apple rotten. A role that when undertaken, requires deliverance with diplomacy and instigation. This allows the DJ to control the music, and the Host to control the crowd.

With funky having various ancestors, the sound holds a collaboration of influences, with House, Garage and Grime having the most bearing. It is for this reason that while one track may reflect a softer soulful vibe, the next could be much darker and broken, one of the qualities of the sound that increases its appeal and marketability. However it is also this element of the sound that has proven to hold disadvantage where it has attracted a trend not welcomed by the true connoisseurs who feel that it has been misconceived and manipulated by the newcomers to the movement producing material such as this:

It has been felt that this new craze that has been said to have contaminated the funky sound is nothing more than what could’ve been expected, as there is such a lack of structure, a result of its diversity. While when delivered in originality it is widely appreciated, in imitation, it is scorned. The movement has been nurtured by its true loves to ensure its stance is moulded correctly so the foundations are laid with longstanding format.

The word has been spoken by many that have been large contributors to the growth of the movement that this new craze is in deep requirement of being purged from the scene. Although all participation has previously been welcomed, this new sound has been rejected as a strain of the funky generics and has been advised that the innovators of this heavily MC based and dance move sound, start a new movement of their own calling it something different.

Within this video interview (4.30 – 5.07 mins), Marcus Nasty who has been crowned the God-Father of the movement as a major benefactor, voices his feelings on this particular subject.

There is an evident thirst for this type of music, witnessed within the universities across the country, which indicates that there is an appeal. The question really is whether it’s possible for a sound that hasn’t yet found it’s own true form, is able to evolve far enough to provide birth of another new sound without them being combined as one?

Matt Jam Lamont talks Funky!!!

Matt Jam Lamont

Matt Jam Lamont

I recently carried out an interview with Matt Jam Lamont for UrbanWorld.Com which unexpectedly drifted on to the subject of UK House also known as Funky. I thought that as a major DJ his perspective was very valuable……. Here are a few questions from the interview:

Is there any chance of you crossing genres in the future to playing UK House productions?

I’ve never ever stopped playing House. I was playing it before Garage came alive. So it’s not something that I’ve stopped or started playing. I’ve always played House. It’s just that I’m more known for Garage from back in the day. With any genre, there is always a new style that branches off and the UK stuff is raw, some would say under produced, but that’s what it is, but really it’s just another branch coming of the House genre. House has been there forever so it’s not me jumping on to anything else, if there’s a certain track that is produced and I like it, then I’ll play it.

Do you see the UK House scene growing and staying or do you see it rapidly going back underground?

Garage was around for nearly 11 years and it done what it really needed to do. The UK House scene, I think it could stay around as it has such a dominant father figure in House. It has a good chance of being around for the while. There are so many sub-genres from House, it’ll be interesting to see what it does. I think the production needs to be tighter on a few things, but look at Devil in a Blue Dress. It’s a big anthem. But for UK House to get more stronger abroad, they do need to tighten up production a little bit and have the big major players playing it abroad too. But I can see a good life span in it. I’ve noticed that up north a lot of the DJs have stopped playing Bassline, and are moving over to House and its known for people to jump genre to whatever is popular, so that happening shows that the popularity is definitely growing. But I would say that a lot of the DJs that are playing UK House also play US stuff too so it’s getting balanced out and with things from Defected etc so although there is a scene there, it’s not dominated by UK House productions.

The US productions are very prominent within the music…..

It’s like with Drum and Bass. It’s a very British thing but you have a lot of Americans and Germans making it too because they love it, so the UK House sound is not really anything new. But there is a certain sound that’s developing as a new branch of House music which is great. In a year’s time, I do hope that it will be stronger but I don’t think these guys will start to only play UK stuff. I think they’ll still be playing productions from around the world that plays nicely with what they’re playing, which is evident if you look at Footloose or Pioneer’s play list. The UK House scene is getting stronger, but I don’t think it’ll be able to do it on its own.

Do you think Funky and Garage are the same?

Yeah, but you know, I think that’s because a lot of the ex garage producers are now making it so its carrying a lot of the same sounds. So that’s why it’s more on a UK stage than a House stage. Because I can play it in any UK set and I play it with Garage. But it’s not new garage or anything. There’s not really much that that new about it, I could probably find something similar from 1990. Things start to evolve and its given a new name to help give it a push so I guess it’s simply just a new branch of house. It hasn’t blown up to me as yet because it hasn’t blown up in Ibiza. That’s the biggest clubbing island in Summer. So until that happens…….. I’m not knocking it at all. I hope it does get bigger because there are some tracks which I really do like. So let’s develop it and make it stronger now.

THIS INTERVIEW CAN BE READ IN FULL HERE!!!

DJ/Producer MA-1 Gives It Up to Queen of Sheba

DJ/Producer MA-1

DJ/Producer MA-1

Following the release of his recent single, I caught up with DJ/Producer MA-1 to find out a little bit about him and his personal journey within the scene. How he got into the music, to becoming involved with the scene, to actually making the music within it.

Being a highly respected DJ/Producer within the movement I also thought it’d be interesting to find out his secrets on production and what he felt would benefit the scene in the long run as well as what it is that he personally favours……

What is your background within the scene? As in, how did you get into House Music?

Well I went to a rave with DJ Feva in November 2005. Then I only knew him as a Garage DJ. Tippa and IC were there playing some tunes mixed in with garage. I didn’t know what they were at the time because I’d never heard it before. Then Feva come on for the closing set and he was playing all these tunes again that just blew my head off. The crowd were just dancing and reacting in the same way that I was used to at old skool garage raves. I had to call him up and ask him what that music he was playing was. Garage wise I was into Tuff Jam and EZ and when I asked him, he was laughing. But he was playing older house stuff like Samurai and Gabryelle which just blew me away but yeah he told me what it was and I got really into it.

So what stage did you start getting into DJing funky house?

I went to a few clubs with Tippa and IC and really got into the music. These times they weren’t even Circle they were Allsbury Allstars. At that time I was buying a few of the early big tunes and I mixed them up and went down to Red Carpet one night and gave the guys over there a CD. He called me the next day to tell me that he wanted to do a giveaway CD to promote Red Carpet and that’s how I got to do one of the first rave CDs with an advert. That was like end of 2005. Before I knew it, I was hearing it everywhere. Nobody knew my face, but everyone knew my name because of this CD. The response just blew me away and all I wanted after that was to get bookings and get on to Deja Vu FM. At the time, it was the station that was really carrying the music. There was Kismet, Supa, Tippa, IC, Pioneer, Angie B and Dogtaniun and when I got there, well that was me. I’m on Rinse FM now though.

MA-1

Did you see yourself ever gaining the status that you have i.e. playing across seas etc?

Not really, I got into it just for fun. When I started it was a hobby. I enjoyed mixing. All my friends round my area done it too. Back then it was about Speed Garage which was more the music of the working class rather than a black or white thing. Everyone raved together. But I remember going to college and asking people what Garage was. Then I went out to some raves and thought it was good and just starting buying the tunes. I then started off playing in little raves around the area and the places just got bigger and bigger. I’ve played for many pirate stations, Upfront, Freek FM and Flashback FM, but I did get to one point when I thought to forget it all. I was buying all these records and I questioned myself and what I was doing. Around June 2005 I gave up music. I just wanted to go work and just be normal. So it just happened really. I never planned any of it.

What stage did you feel that as well as playing you wanted to start producing?

Back then when I got into the scene most of the UK tunes were dubs that never had any vocals. The only vocal tune at that had really taken off at that time was NG’s “Tell me”. I just wanted to make a tune that was a good vocal track and that was my goal. I always wanted to do that and eventually in the end, I did it. I made the tune in my bedroom. It wasn’t that easy though. When I first made the tune, I never had anyone to vocal it. I asked the people I knew if they knew any singers and it turned out that Sophia lived at the top of my road and I’d known her since she was little. Anyway, she came to my house, and recorded it. I then had to go to a professional recording studio, pay my money and get it mixed down. Before I knew it all the DJs were playing it, then I got a call from 1xtra saying they wanted to put my tune on the radio playlist and then it just blew up all over the radio really quick. Being a DJ and using my experience from other scenes, I realised that the people who really cross the boundaries are producers. Other than EZ and Heartless, people remember the producers from the Garage scene i.e. Artful Dodger, so knew that was what I wanted to do.

Karnival Music….. Explain what that’s about……

It’s my record label. The name really comes from the fact that at the time most of the sound was of an afrobeat style, so to me, what we were playing was carnival music, so that’s what I named it. It’s not just for my tunes though, if I hear tunes that I like, I can push it for you and we can cut some kind of deal, then I put it out. Basically it’s because say for instance, you get a producer who is up in Birmingham, he could make a banging tune, but it doesn’t really get heard. But if I take it and it goes on my label, then the level of exposure is much more. For instance there are other tracks that have been put on my label where I’ve come to an agreement with people. Now if they gave it directly to one of the bigger named DJs, the chances of him listening to it and playing it are lower than if it’s given to him by me. So yeah, that’s that.

Give It Up ft Sim Simi has recently been released. Tell me a bit about the background of that track…

I made “Give It Up” very soon after I made “I’m Right Here”. Me and Simone hooked up through MySpace. She hollered at me to say that she liked my sound and wanted us to work together and I called her up. We talked about what she wanted to do and then got together basically. But because “I’m Right Here” was so popular, I kind of put it on a back burner. But when I saw that things had really calmed down with “I’m Right Here” and other tracks had pushed it out of the spotlight, I felt that it was time to put it out. Give It Up is out now on junodownload.com, ukfunky.com and dubplate.net. It’s selling really well.

Do you feel that the funky scene is here to stay for an era, or do you feel that is may fizzle out as a phase?

I don’t know if it’s gonna stay forever. I mean I hope it does. But the music scene has changed a lot since I first got involved in 05. From the way we play it to who the top DJs are. When I started it was all about Booker T and Gavin Peters, now you hear more about Supa D, Pioneer and Marcus Nasty. I think its going to continue evolving, so it can’t be going anywhere for now.

What do you think will help the scene to grow bigger than it is right now to really embed itself within the mainstream?

Better quality tunes and a chart success. No question about that. I’m not gonna act all big about the quality of my production and that because I’m still learning myself and I give respect to anyone who has sat down for hours from day to day, to make a beat, whether I personally think its good or not. But they have to do the best they can do. Whether they get it mixed down by somebody else, there’s no shame in someone else mixing down your tracks for you. Get a professional. I did it, there’s no shame in it and if you’re looking to make a banger, you’d be surprised how much a difference mixing it down can make. I think at the moment, people outside of our scene are listening to the majority of our tunes and thinking that we’re all jokers. They hear our music and think to themselves “What’s that?” See it’s difficult, some people are impartial to our sound, others want to criticise it. The majority of the nation hasn’t heard anything we do as yet because commercial radio isn’t really supporting our sound. They all have our tracks, but they’re not really play listed during the day time so most people outside of the urban areas will never have heard it. Take Bongo Jam for instance, it got a lot of publicity due to Big Brother, but Harry Hill totally disrespected it. Then there’s the London club scene at the moment which still exists but they’re all knocking it saying there’s trouble. But there’s trouble in normal clubs as well.

So what do you personally love most about the scene?

It’s new, different and fresh. When I first saw it I knew it was gonna be big. I saw it. I had to be part of it. It’ll grow and it’ll get more popular. Some of the tunes will get commercial and hit charts. Like with Garage, when that first started it was underground, but there were many Garage chart hits. Whether its next year or a few more after that. This isn’t by far the final article.

Is there anything you’d like to add?

Not really, but this whole funky thing is all good and its spreading around the country and it’s across seas. Napa really helped the scene grow and it’s really strong up north now, so it’s still growing and it will grow a lot further. The whole Bassline thing is rumoured to be calming down so it’s time for funky to really take over the whole country. That’s the next step.

She’s A Devil In A Blue Dress

Having found his feet within the music industry, exploring the genres and creating a network with established players along the way, Doneao feels the time has come to step out from behind the scenes. Filming a video to accompany Devil in a Blue Dress, the hugely successful hit within the UK Funky scene……

It’s an early start for a Sunday morning with London’s Stanza club as the destination. This would usually bring the thought of an after party to mind, but today its all lights, camera, action. With everybody tired from the social activity within the past 12 hours, the only lay in on this day, seems to have been granted to the sun.

Arriving on set shortly before the hours of 10am, wardrobe, hair and make up shortly arrive with no delays, and an instant start is made on the transformation to make the temptress of the day and Doneao is more than impressed with his options of outfit. He decides on Suave & Chic, a winning choice every time.

Filming commences soon after midday and Doneao is pulling out his skanks in the bank for the camera. The director even has a shot dedicated to his feet!! Who knows, he may have been taking visual notes to try out in front of the mirror at home…….

Proving to be thirsty work, a break is called soon after an hour with orders taken for lunch, then its back to Doneao skanking out for the cameras again. By the time his shot is finished it 3pm, all the cast members have arrived and our Devil in the Blue Dress is ready. At this time, any man would think himself lucky to be scheduled for seduction by this temptress. But first he would have to wait…… Within the midst of lunch, there are changes of clothes taking place and a photo shoot is underway. Doneao is taking full advantage of the wardrobe in full entirety.

As late afternoon drifts into the evening hours, all stomachs are full and cameo appearance members present, its time to wrap up this beautiful creation. As shooting resumes within a party scene, the smiles are definitely not just for camera. Although this is work for all on Doneao’s path to success, the vibe depicted is surely real and will be watched back by those present, as the day Doneao entertained us and showed us a good time. Although the DJ did seem a bit restricted on his selection……

I managed to catch up with Doneao throughout the course of the day to discuss his road so far within his music career. This is what he had to say:

We’re here today filming Devil in a Blue Dress. Tell me a bit about the song’s background.

I originally released the track to DJs back in November last year. I gave them both an instrumental and a vocal to allow them to play their preference. I found that a lot of them originally played the instrumental, and then the one with the vocals started to creep in later.

What was the response you received during that time?

The response was huge! I released another track last July called “I” and “When You’re Alone”, but “Devil” seems to have really hit them. There’s been play listing on mainstream radio stations, so for me it’s a phenomenal success from the underground, especially as an independent artist and having to take care of my own marketing etc.

I believe your label is called Zephron Entertainment?

It’s more of a production company. It’s a small company and at the moment I can only look after myself. I would like to build on it, but our first release is going to be “African Warrior”. But I’ve had to start from the bottom. I managed to push “Devil” to a point where 1xtra approached me, but Choice FM and other commercial stations were from me working hard on the streets. I try not to push things in people’s faces though and I think that contributed a lot to “Devil” blowing up more than “I”. Simply because I let the people choose and there was more hype for “Devil”, so more people have got involved.

You’ve been on the music scene for a while haven’t you?

Yeah. Since I was 19. Going back to the times of UK Garage. My first proper tune was “Bounce” which was right in the beginning stages of my creativity. I knew when I was 6 that I wanted to do music and then when I turned 16, my dad helped me get my first studio. Then I had to really find myself musically, and “Bounce” was the first finished tune that I really ever made. But you make a whole heap of tunes and you think they’re ok, but they’re more like preparation. “Bounce” really showed me that I could make tracks that people liked, but I hadn’t homed in on my creativity, I still had to study myself. Not taking anything away from “Bounce”. It was a good experience and got me in the limelight, but I would advise people that before releasing a track, it’s a good idea to have more ready. Because if it bombs you got more behind you, and if it blows, people are gonna wanna hear more and I wasn’t prepared……There were about 3 years between my first 2 singles and during that time I really got to learn my craft.

So would you say that “I” was the produce of a more matured Doneao?

I didn’t actually produce “I”, and I don’t really work with other producers, being a producer myself. But I would say I homed in on my craft before “I”, while making Grime. Then when I starting making House, I found some real inspiration within my creativity, because “I” was my first House track and I just wanted to keep making more.

Where do you find the inspirations when making your House tracks?

When funky first started to come about, I wanted to know more about it and I started to research House music and its structures, and I learnt that even Garage originated from House. Then I realised there were more sub genres such as Acid, Dance, Electro and I felt that this is the genre where I really wanted to be, reflecting on the fact that I originated within Garage. Not having produced “I” myself and it being totally different to anything that I had made, I wanted to see what I could come up with and “Devil in a Blue Dress” and a few other tracks is really what I got. So even though I’ve been on the scene for a while, I’ve been finding myself and where I belong during that time.

With Devil already being so successful on the underground, where do you see the single going after the official release?

All the way hopefully!! I can only hope to get a number one from it. I’ll push as hard as I can to see how far it can go. If it doesn’t reach number one, I can only hope that it does the best it can do. I’m working hard for it, the whole team are. Anyone that’s interested in my music, I’ll be willing to meet the demand.

We saw you at Glastonbury earlier on this year. What was that experience like for you?

That was heavy man!! But it weren’t just me. It was me and my band, we’re a team. If I get signed, I would like to be signed with them. But it was a great experience. It was the first time we played and all the equipment was like new and the live sound system. We’ve done other live gigs, but that was the biggest.

Is this the first time you’ve done a video too?

This is my first solo video. I’ve done cameos here and there, but this one is all about me. I’ve never really let people see my face, but this tune got so big, I knew that if I wanted to continue promoting it, I’d have to step out from behind the scenes and into the spotlight.

How are you finding the experience?

I’m embracing it at the moment, it’s a bit different from what I’m used to doing, but there’s going to be other things as well like magazine interviews etc but I’m used to staying in the studio and putting tunes out. That’s it. I know how to market myself indirectly, but not in the spotlight. This is the first part of the whole experience for me personally, but the second stage for the single.

So what can we expect in the future?

I’m due to release another 2 singles which I’ve already had good responses for from DJs. I also done a few PA’s in Aiya Napa and Funky seems to be really smashing it over there alongside Niche. But those tracks are still new on the underground so it may be a while before they become as mainstream as “Devil”. In about 3 months time, I think I’ll be in a better position to see what those tracks are really doing, and how I’m truthfully finding the whole experience.